Recently I have upgraded my security cameras for the house. I have used 8 ( 4 dome and 4 bullet ) analog SONY cameras. A digital VDR attached to the house network.

All of the cameras where routed with CAT 5e cable. I used a balun and 12V injector to transmit the analog signals including power to the cameras. I did this since it was just a matter of time before I would go all digital. At that time however the only supplier of decent network cameras was Axis. For a home owner they are a bit too expensive starting at 6000 kr ( 650 USD ) per camera.

However, recently the Chinese market is swamped with really good network cameras at a fraction of the cost.

I choose to work with HIK Vision. They cost around 700-800 kr ( 80 USD ) come as dome and bullet. Indoor as well as outdoor use.

Main features

  • The company has a legit real homepage. They are also available in both my alarm system and my Synology NAS as pre-configured cameras.
  • PoE at 5W
  • 3M and very good picture. Very good low-lux operation also.
  • WDR
  • Varifocal as an option. Can also be bought at various fixed focal.
  • ONVIF support as well as a load of other protocols.
  • Swedish language in the web interface. The best Swedish I have seen in a overseas product. Overall the GUI is very nice also.

Neither easier nor harder to set-up and configure as any other cameras. Basically just to attach the network cable, mount it and attach the cable to a PoE switch.

In my network I have 2 D-Link DGS-1210-08P 8-Port Gigabit PoE with a 45W total power capability on the 8 ports.

One thing that I found out during this was that HIK Vision has a very strange and stupid default setting for the IP on the cameras. For some reason they are set to static IP with the IP set to 192.0.0.64.

Not really that easy to guess. The manuals leave alot to be desired in this respect.

The static IP also means you have to attach the camera to a computer with that specific network and re-configure the camera.

Why not USE DHCP initialy!

… now we just have to see how well they survive the Swedish winter …